July 28, 2011

Singer 327 K (1964)

Found the 327 k at an estate sale and although it was a low end model in its day it turned out to be one of the most reliable machines I have. Made in England (k) in 1964 it has the great turquoise color scheme and a well made matching carrying case.


It sews all my garment weight leather without a complaint, and was my number one machine untill I recently discovered the New Home 532.


I don't know why these things are so popular? Maybe they made so many that everyone can find them easily?

I have to admit that I like the fact (on any machine) that the reverse stays in reverse for the next line of sewing; it makes it easier to start in reverse then to have to free up your hand at the very beginning of a new stitch line. This would be a good option on the newest of machines; the ability to remain in reverse after the reverse button has been hit. Just like the auto needle up position the computer could be told to stay in reverse or not.



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14 comments:

  1. This is my first personal sewing machine which i found at a fleamarket. I questioned buying at first because it was missing the lid for the bobbin compartment, but the seller demonstrated that it indeed worked. The other machines were not singer so I took the chance and bought it. The missing parts I have been able to find online. Not bad for a twenty dollar purchase. Not sure what feet are available for it, but hope to find out soon. I may become proficient enough to buy one of the new models.

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    1. hi, good luck with it; it's a work horse!
      Feet are mostly comon either "high shank" or "low shank" almost any one that screws on will do if its the same general height

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  2. Ha! That machine was made in Scotland!

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    1. yes in Scotland! in 1961. i am using it for many years, love it!!!!

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  3. I just bought one of these off eBay. A little tweeking and cleaning has been it. This machine is a tough machine. I love the fact that it is all metal gears. No plastic or teflon gears in this baby!!!

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    1. It's a geeky yet fearless looking machine with bumps and lumps allover; that's what makes it so loveable. Who needs anything more than straight and ZZ?

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  4. I was just wondering when mine was made as it seems to be working so well after all this time. Got mine in a charity shop (thrift store?) for 20 pounds - it obviously belonged to a very careful previous owner as it came with all the attachments still in a box. Bless. Lucky me :-)) It's also built into a fine wooden sewing table - not quite so handy for trucking around but very nice to look at. Goes backwards too, not just straight and Zee! It was the lovely colour and retro styling that I fell for but it has so much more to offer!

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    1. Yes, it seems to be a well respected machine and for good reason, but definetly not a travel machine.
      You can pin-point the year and location of manufacture on the Singer site (http://www.singerco.com/support/machine-serial-numbers) you will recognise the number on the underside of the machine when you see it.
      Have fun!

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  5. was made in Scotland! in 1961. i am using it for many years, love it!!!!

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  6. was made in Scotland! in 1961. i am using it for many years, love it!!!!

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  7. I have a piece that was made in Great Britain. It looks like to be a 1961 but can't seem to find the exact serial number. Serial number is ET150566. Do any of you know how I could find online it's estimated worth? Thank you! Mel

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    1. Its just an Ebay / Craigslist search, you may have to be patient.

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  8. My mum bought me mine a few weeks ago, because I wanted one. We are of Scottish decent so to find this out gave us a good chuckle. I just hope I can get it cleaned and repaired. It's missing bobbins and 's needle.

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